Pre-1993 players had more hazardous working conditions than today’s players:

“Full-contact two a day practices for two months; no concussion protocol; inferior equipment; inferior medical procedures; AstroTurf fields; rules that allowed horse collaring, crack backs, spearing, head slapping, the wedge.”
– Jeff Nixon “Show Me the Money.” The Nixon Report, March 8, 2016.

At FAIR, giving voice to our impacted players is what we are all about. These men are experiencing significant medical and financial challenges.

We are committed to working with the NFLPA and the NFL to provide them modest retirement compensation that will allow them to live out their hard-earned retirement with dignity.


These are just some of the Pre-1993 NFL players impacted:

 

Reggie Williams

Then:

  • Bengals linebacker (1976-1989)
  • Whizzer White NFL Man of the Year (1985)
  • Walter Payton Man of the Year (1986)
  • Sports Illustrated Sportsman of the Year (1987)

Now:

  • 24 knee surgeries
  • Four knee replacements
  • Estimates that football-related injuries have cost him hundreds of thousands of dollars out of pocket

Read more about his story here.

 

Rickey Dixon

Then:

  • Bengals and Raiders linebacker (1988-1993)
  • Jim Thorpe Award winner at the University of Nebraska (1987)
  • First round draft pick in 1988

Now:

  • Diagnosed with ALS in 2013 and given 3 to 5 years to live.
  • Injuries sustained playing football are believed to be the cause.

“I look at Rickey laying in the hospital bed, trac in his throat, tube in his stomach, has lost 57% of his body weight, can’t talk and can barely move and I think about the NFL and I ask Jesus to help me forgive them.”  – Lorraine Dixon

Read more about his story here.

 

Tony Dorsett

Then:

  • Cowboys and Broncos running back (1977-1988)
  • NFL Hall of Famer
  • Four time Pro-Bowler
  • Heisman Trophy Winner

Now:

  • Diagnosed by UCLA researchers with C.T.E.
  • Currently suffering from unexplained fits of rage and severe memory loss.
  • Requires full time in-home care.

“I hate it, and I get really, really—and that can make me get real frustrated, if I’m not careful. I get mad at myself for certain things. Not knowing how to get certain places, forgetting where I’m going, driving somewhere then forgetting where I’m going.” – Tony Dorsett

Read more about his story here and here.

 

Gale Sayers

Then:

  • Bears running back (1965-1971)
  • Youngest player ever elected to the NFL Hall of Fame
  • NFL Rookie of the Year (1965)
  • Four time Pro-Bowler

Now:

  • Former Athletic Director at Southern Illinois University
  • Battling severe dementia
  • Difficulty doing simple tasks like signing his own name
  • Requires regular in-home care

“Like the doctor at the Mayo Clinic said, ‘Yes, a part of this has to be on football.’ It wasn’t so much getting hit in the head … It’s just the shaking of the brain when they took him down with the force they play the game in.” – Ardie Sayers

Read more about his story here and here.

 

Conrad Dobler

Then:

  • Cardinals, Saints and Bills Guard (1972-1981)
  • Three time Pro-Bowler
  • 129 career games played

Now:

  • Suffering from severe memory loss
  • Considered to be 90% disabled
  • Has had numerous knee surgeries

 

“I have six kids, I don’t even know their names. It kind of pisses me off because I prided myself on having such a wonderful memory.” – Conrad Dobler

Read more about his story here.

 

Nick Buoniconti: 

Then:

  • Patriots and Dolphins linebacker (1962-1974, 1975)
  • Member of the undefeated 1972 Dolphins
  • Two-time Super Bowl champion
  • Two-time Pro-Bowler

Now:

  • Battling dementia
  • Difficulty doing simple tasks like using the restroom

 

“I feel lost. I feel like a child.” – Nick Buoniconti

Read more about his story here.

 

Jim Kiick: 

  • Dolphins, Broncos and Redskins running back (1968-1974, 1976-1977)
  • Member of the undefeated 1972 Dolphins
  • Two-time Super Bowl champion
  • Two-time AFL All-Star

Now:

  • Battling CTE and early-onset Alzheimer’s
  • Illness forced him out of his job
  • Son dropped out of college to care for him

“I just remember seeing the biggest change in him. He just acts like a kid, in every way now – not taking care of himself. We tell him what to do and he listens, but he was pooping his pants, All that stuff. So I – literally – mean that he had turned into a kid.” – Allie Kiick

Read more about his story here.

 

Ed White: 

Then:

  • Vikings and Chargers (1969-1985) offensive guard and lineman
  • Super Bowl champion
  • Four-time Pro-Bowler
  • 50 Greatest Minnesota Vikings
  • San Diego Chargers

Now:

  • Battling Alzheimer’s

“Four years ago I went to Minnesota and 10 of us who played in Super Bowls got together. Everybody had something going on, so it’s pretty wide spread.” – Ed White

Read more about his story here.